There's More Evidence of a Resurgence of Manufacturing in the United States

 
 

The Atlantic Monthly's December issue offers up a pair of excellent articles on the resurgence of industrial activity in the United States. In "The Insourcing Boom," Charles Fishman takes us through the story of Appliance Park, an industrial park in Kentucky that was headquarters to

GE's appliance division. The park had 16,000 workers in 1955, but gradually emptied out as Jack Welch move more and more of its appliance production offshore. But in the past year, GE has begun to bring back production of things like water heaters and dish washers. And they've learned that by redesigning products and production lines, they can produce products more cheaply than in China with the added benefit of not risking the loss of intellectual property. In a second article "Mr. China Comes to America," James Fallows describes how manufacturers are increasingly establishing facilities in the United States to be close to innovation that's being driven by pairing technology, design and such tools as 3-D printing. Fallows story focuses on San Francisco. But Washington state is also seeing a resurgence of manufacturing. Let us know what you are up to by entering our Washington Manufacturing Awards. The nomination form is here.

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

Winner: Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
 
Legacy Award
Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
Auburn › belshaw-adamatic.com
When it’s time to make doughnuts — or loaves of bread, or sheets of rolls — it could well be a Belshaw Adamatic piece of equipment that’s turning out the baked goods. From a 120,000-square-foot plant in Auburn, Belshaw Adamatic produces the ovens, fryers, conveyors and specialty equipment like jelly injectors used by wholesale and retail bakeries.
 
The firm’s two legacy companies — Belshaw started in 1923, Adamatic in 1962 — combined forces in 2007. Italy’s Ali Group North America is the parent.
 
It it takes work to maintain a legacy. A months-long strike in 2013 damaged morale and forced a leadership change. Frank Chandler was named president and CEO of Belshaw Adamatic in September 2013. The company has since strived to mend workplace relationships while also introducing a stream of new products, such as a convection oven, the BX Eco-touch, with energy saving features and steam injection that can be programmed for precise times in baking. The company energetically describes it as “an oven that saves time, reduces errors, makes an awesome product, and is fun to use and depend on every day!”
 
So far, more than 3,000 have been installed in quick-service restaurants, bakeries, cafés and supermarkets in the United States. They are the legacy of Thomas and Walter Belshaw, former builders of marine engines, who began producing patented manual and automated doughnut-making machines in Seattle 90 years ago. They sold thousands worldwide and, today, Belshaw Adamatic is the nation’s largest maker and distributor of doughnut-making equipment.