Seattle Business magazine is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2017 Leaders in Health Care awards. The finalists, chosen by a panel of expert judges, are individuals and institutions leading the charge to improve Washington's world-class health care sector. This year's finalists are:

 
With evidence of a booming economy practically everywhere we look — help-wanted signs, local government surpluses, congested freeways — it is difficult to imagine a slowdown,” I said at a business leadership conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, in early 1990. “But a closer look at the nature of the Seattle economy and its recent growth portends change.”
 

As every first-year business student knows, a city’s economy is not considered “world class” until said city has erected at least four shrines to professional sports and these shrines remain empty and unused most days of the year.

It’s easy to be pessimistic about the outlook for 2017. After 90 months of growth, the economic expansion is aging and may not have much life left.

When Bill Gates visited the Seattle World’s Fair as a 6-year-old in 1962, he claims to have visited every pavilion. At the General Electric Living pavilion, he would have seen a vision of a digitized residence, with home computers, electronic libraries and television programming projected on the interior walls.

When you get right down to it, a family business will always be a mom-and-pop operation.

Larry W. “Chip” Hunter, a scholar of human resource management and industrial relations, became dean of Washington State University’s Carson College of Business in March 2015. He aims to make Carson College the premier place in the Northwest for an undergraduate business education.

You’d have to go all the way back to the heady days of the dot-com boom in 2000 to match the amount of new office space coming on to the Seattle-Bellevue market this year. 

It’s been 17 years since this much office space – 4.6 million square feet total –has been set to be delivered, according to a Q4 2016 report from the Chicago-based real estate services firm Jones Lang LaSalle. Just over half of that space, 51.2 percent, has been preleased.