Spotlight: iCatching or iSore?

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Apple, universally adored for its design innovation and strong aesthetics, has become the most valuable company in the world, capitalized today at more than $630 billion. Analysts expect  Apple’s star will continue to rise as it designs its way into better and cooler products and projects. But not everyone is an Apple polisher. Bellevue feng shui master Shan-Tung Hsu warns that Apple may be designing its way into oblivion with the proposed circle-shaped Apple 2 campus headquarters in Cupertino, California, designed by the London architectural firm Foster + Partners. Hsu says the spaceship-like design, which will house 13,000 employees, violates many of the basic principles of the ancient Chinese discipline of feng shui because it lacks a strong spine, a central focal point to house the company’s “soul” and an opening to interact with the world. Such circular spaces as Apple’s planned building, while dynamic, do not resonate with corporate and intellectual activity, he says. They can “spin but not grow” and are the antithesis to creativity and productivity. Hsu continues: “The open green space in the center is too large and the only focal point is the empty green space. ... When the focal point, known in feng shui as the energy spot, is empty, no other design features are significant, no matter how elegant and innovative the design.” Apple’s cofounder, the late Steve Jobs, was an ardent student of Eastern philosophies such as Zen Buddhism, but his interest apparently didn’t extend to feng shui. Jobs claimed the facility would be “the best office building in the world."

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

Winner: Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
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Legacy Award
Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
Auburn › belshaw-adamatic.com
When it’s time to make doughnuts — or loaves of bread, or sheets of rolls — it could well be a Belshaw Adamatic piece of equipment that’s turning out the baked goods. From a 120,000-square-foot plant in Auburn, Belshaw Adamatic produces the ovens, fryers, conveyors and specialty equipment like jelly injectors used by wholesale and retail bakeries.
 
The firm’s two legacy companies — Belshaw started in 1923, Adamatic in 1962 — combined forces in 2007. Italy’s Ali Group North America is the parent.
 
It it takes work to maintain a legacy. A months-long strike in 2013 damaged morale and forced a leadership change. Frank Chandler was named president and CEO of Belshaw Adamatic in September 2013. The company has since strived to mend workplace relationships while also introducing a stream of new products, such as a convection oven, the BX Eco-touch, with energy saving features and steam injection that can be programmed for precise times in baking. The company energetically describes it as “an oven that saves time, reduces errors, makes an awesome product, and is fun to use and depend on every day!”
 
So far, more than 3,000 have been installed in quick-service restaurants, bakeries, cafés and supermarkets in the United States. They are the legacy of Thomas and Walter Belshaw, former builders of marine engines, who began producing patented manual and automated doughnut-making machines in Seattle 90 years ago. They sold thousands worldwide and, today, Belshaw Adamatic is the nation’s largest maker and distributor of doughnut-making equipment.