How Worried Are You?

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Recent events in Japan have caused some businesses to worry about whether they are prepared to keep operating after a major earthquake, especially since the greater Seattle area is situated on the Cascadia fault.

Given the economic climate, disaster preparedness is often the last thing on an executive’s mind these days, but creating a plan can save your business. It cuts the number of decisions you have to make during the disaster, reduces your legal liability and can safeguard your business brand and reputation. Absence of a plan could include your business among the 25 percent of companies that fail after a disaster, usually because they had no plans.

Having worked through these issues at Washington Mutual by managing problems caused by hurricanes, earthquakes, wildfires and winter storms, I’ve devised some questions you might use to test your preparedness strategy.

1. Which of your business functions are most critical and which can be suspended during a disaster?

2. Do you have streamlined emergency response plans that can be activated?

3. Which of your critical business functions are handled for you by vendors? What types of backup plans do those vendors have to keep your business up and running? At WaMu, we made sure that our third-party courier companies had good backup plans, since we depended upon them to move our cash around the country. Our branches could not operate without cash, and we knew that dispensing cash was a critical business function.

4. Once you have such business priorities identified, which parts of your business can be run manually, without technology’s assistance, if power is not available? Can you invoice customers? Can you pay bills? Can you supplement your existing inventory? Can you deliver goods to customers? Have employees been trained to step in and do more than one job?

5. Does your business already have phone trees with employee contact information so you can pass along vital information and ascertain employees’ safety?

6. Assuming that power is available outside the affected area, do you have alternate data centers from which you can operate in case your primary data center was damaged in the earthquake? If not, have you considered storing data in an internet cloud so it is available from your home or office via a secure internet connection?

7. Have you identified and rehearsed employees on locations in your buildings where they can “duck/cover/hold” while an earthquake is taking place?

8. If you are a larger company, do you have sufficient diesel fuel to power the generators you will use to keep on working?

From this list you can see there are a number of ways to anticipate issues and not all of them are expensive. Sharing your plans with employees is vital so they know what their roles will be in an emergency. And communicating with both customers and employees becomes even more important in the midst of an earthquake. In this situation, both email and social media tools come in handy. There is no way to communicate too much in a disaster, especially to lead your people and reinforce key points for your company.

Finally, if you’re the CEO, be prepared to be vilified in the press if you don’t move quickly enough and if you don’t communicate clearly. You’re paid to do everything possible and to think outside the box so that your company does not end up with a black eye. Given the lives and resources at stake, having a plan is the least you can do now to reduce your risk after a natural disaster ... or two or three disasters, as we have just seen in Japan.

Annie Searle is founder of Annie Searle & Associates, a consulting firm that helps clients identify program gaps and manage risks. A former executive at Washington Mutual, Searle served for seven years as chair of the bank’s crisis management team.

Final Analysis: The Sporting Life in 2017

Final Analysis: The Sporting Life in 2017

Three predictions for the coming year on a new arena, an old arena and the Mariners.
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
 
As every first-year business student knows, a city’s economy is not considered “world class” until said city has erected at least four shrines to professional sports and these shrines remain empty and unused most days of the year. Seattle is knocking on the door of world classiness because it already has KeyArena, Safeco Field and CenturyLink Field up and running. Occasionally. Just one more monument to appease the great mass of athletic supporters and we’re there. Hallelujah!
 
It’s only a matter of time because Chris Hansen, the San Francisco rich guy who wants to build a new arena on First Avenue South and bring pro basketball and pro hockey to Seattle, is this close to getting his way. In October, Hansen revealed that he and his investors are now willing to pay the whole honkin’ bill for plopping a new arena into the SoDo neighborhood a block from Safeco Field. He still wants a piece of Occidental Way vacated and also expects some tax breaks from the city, but that’s how rich guys are. (See: Trump, Donald.) Besides, the people who believe we’re not world class until the NBA returns to Seattle are salivating over this deal because it’s the best deal we’re ever going to get
 
Of course, these same people said Hansen’s previous offer, which would have required that $200 million in public money be plowed into a new arena, was also the best deal we were ever going to get. 
 
Hansen’s decision to pay more for his arena places the sports economy clearly in the local spotlight this year. Heaven knows we could use more opportunities to pay $9 for a beer and see millionaire athletes selling Jaguars and BMWs on TV. It’s the kind of economic shot in the arm that only comes around whenever a sports league is in a coercive mood. 
 
And so, in the spirit of this January issue’s “looking ahead” theme, we offer three predictions relating to the regional economy as the Hansen arena intrigue continues to unfold.
 
Prediction 1: Hansen, who has already spent more than $120 million buying up property in the area of his proposed arena, will persuade the Port of Seattle, his arch nemesis in this melodrama, to fold up its tent and send all cargo-handling operations to Tacoma. That decision will pave the way for so many trendy bars and restaurants with names like Kale & Kumquat or Cobblestone & Wingtip that Hansen will be persuaded to create a private streetcar system to connect Pioneer Square with the burgeoning Stadium District. 
 
Prediction 2: The city-owned KeyArena, whose very future is clouded by the Hansen proposal, will announce plans to house up to 10,000 homeless persons every day. Even on days when the Seattle Storm and Seattle University basketball teams need the building, the city believes the Storm and the Redhawks could use the attendance boost, so it becomes a classic win-win.
 
Prediction 3: The Seattle Mariners, who still don’t like the arena proposal, will channel their hostility onto the field of play — and still not win the World Series. (This is called pattern-recognition analysis.) However, always mindful of improving the fan experience — because it’s not whether your team wins or loses, but whether you’re inclined not to press charges for being gouged by a vendor — the Mariners will introduce several new fan-friendly food items, plus mani/pedi stations in the pricey seats and roving loan officers to assist anyone trying to finance the purchase of hot dogs and sodas for a family of four. 
 
JOHN LEVESQUE is the managing editor of Seattle Business magazine. Reach him at john.levesque@tigeroak.com.