Issue

November 2009

From this Issue

Going for the total “win” may not be the best strategy.

Meet the new pioneers of Washington's idea factory.

Washington Federal's conservative strategy pays off.

Craig Kinzer has worked in the background of some of the region's biggest deals.

Cara Ely's wedding planner computer game helps I-play tap into a new market: mature women gamers.

How much does that procedure cost? A new site allows you to compare prices.

Local chains can compete against the big players, but only if they're careful.

Behind the glitz of the hot industries of the moment is the staid and steady retail sector.

To: All Staff

From: Bill M. Wallhead, CEO

Subject: Update for 2009-2010

A new green initiative in China presents opportunities for Washington state businesses.

When I first met Jeff Bezos 13 years ago, he had recently left Wall Street to launch Amazon.com, his online bookstore, and was operating it out of a Pioneer Square warehouse. Sitting in his tiny office at a desk made from an unfinished door placed on two sawhorses, he explained the simple logic of his business model.

A Microsoftie's love of wine turns into a business.

Washington's video game industry shows continued strength.

Boeing Commercial Airplanes President and Chief Executive Scott Carson has stepped down after finishing work on the 787 Dreamliner's new schedule. Jim Albaugh, former president and chief executive of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems, was appointed to Carson's position.

Russell Investments, Tacoma's largest private employer, will move next year to downtown Seattle, into the former WaMu Center. The move means 900 well-paying jobs will be leaving the City of Destiny, positions that city will be hard-pressed to replace.

Amazon.com has been criticized in the past for its lack of charitable donations, but recently endowed a $25,000 grant to Literacy Bridge to assist the nonprofit's Talking Book speech and reading comprehension program in Ghana.

Venture Bank, a Lacey bank hampered by losses from real estate investments and stock in collateralized debt offerings, has been closed by regulators and its deposits turned over to First-Citizens Bank & Trust, headquartered in Raleigh, N.C. The bank's 18 branches have reopened under its new owner's name. Venture Bank is the third in Washington to fail this year.

 

 

Venture Bank, a Lacey bank hampered by losses from real estate investments and stock in collateralized debt offerings, has been closed by regulators and its deposits turned over to First-Citizens Bank & Trust, headquartered in Raleigh, N.C. The bank's 18 branches have reopened under its new owner's name. Venture Bank is the third in Washington to fail this year.