Reinventing and Preserving Old Buildings

 
 

Over the years, the concept of adaptive reuse has gained more and more traction across major U.S. cities. The process allows for significant historic buildings to be preserved or brought back to life, even if converted to a different use than their original purpose. By repositioning obsolete buildings, their unique features can be preserved, all the while accommodating changes in demand and technology. As a result, adaptive reuse projects can serve to revitalize their surrounding areas and fuel economic development, without losing that authentic feel.

Seattle is no stranger to adaptive reuse projects. The Emerald City boasts a strong historic-preservation program and a clear commitment to preserving its architectural gems. CommercialCafe  enlisted the help of Yardi Matrix data to compile a list of the city’s most notable adaptive reuse efforts. Here are some highlights:

Grand Central Building

Inscape Arts Building

Olympic Tower

Pier 70

Seattle Trade Technology Center

Starbucks Center

The Globe Building

The Washington Shoe Building

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