Issue

June 2017

From this Issue

It wasn’t another episode of “we’re losing all the old stuff that made this place different and special” that prompted public consternation when Renton-based, family-owned retailer McLendon Hardware agreed to be acquired. 

We’ve all been there. We see an item listed on a restaurant menu and wonder how in heaven’s name it can charge that much for a hamburger. Or some mac ’n’ cheese. Or a simple Caesar salad.

Xuchen Yao and Guoguo Chen were interns at Google working on language-processing technology when Amazon introduced Echo, the media-streaming device equipped with a voice-activated intelligent assistant, which is triggered when the user says the hotword “Alexa.”  

The traditional European drink known as perry has found an ideal climate and an appreciative audience in the Pacific Northwest.

Initially specializing in 20th century photography, Gail Gibson has since expanded her gallery to include contemporary artists working in a variety of media. After 25 years in Pioneer Square, she relocated to a new space in Lower Queen Anne (104 W Roy St.) last fall.

At a large factory in Wenatchee, far from its founder’s roots in China, Fibro Corp. is building a better egg carton.

Founded in 1989 as the Cascade Land Conservancy, Gene Duvernoy’s conservation and stewardship organization known as Forterra, now boasting a staff of 50, has managed more than 400 transactions on $500 million worth of real estate to conserve more than 250,000 acres of land. 

If this journalism thing doesn’t work out, I have a backup plan: helping the pharmaceutical industry come up with names for their new drugs.

When it comes to taking on global warming, few ideas are as audacious as the one put forward by Mark Anderson, the Friday Harbor-based CEO of Strategic News Service who has a knack for identifying technology trends.

With land to build new housing becoming scarcer in the Puget Sound region, competition among builders is getting tougher. 

Business and philanthropy have traditionally formed a dichotomy. Business is the pursuit of monetary profits, philanthropy the pursuit of social good with donated money. 

A look back at Seattle's history, courtesy of the Museum of History & Industry.

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A photo gallery from the Mutual Materials brick plant in Mica, Washington.

On a recent visit to Berkeley, where I attended the University of California in the late 1970s, I was struck by how little the city had changed. The neighborhoods are still lined with century-old houses. 

The United States pays more for and gets less from its health care system than peer nations.

President Trump’s “skinny budget” proposal slashes appropriations for dozens of domestic programs that feed money to cities. Federal transportation, housing, environmental, education and law enforcement funds are just some of the revenue line items that are built into Seattle’s city budget and are at risk.