Issue

July 2010

From this Issue

Steps you can take to become a best company to work for.

Leslie HelmOn his long journey from golf caddy at age 12 to his current
position as CEO of one of our state’s leading defense and aerospace companies,

The choice financial newsletter from BIG, the Billionaire Investment Group.

Employers need to start assessing the impact of health care reform.

A new mayor has not changed Seattle’s transportation morass.

CEO, Esterline Technologies Corp.

Schools turn to industry to find out what skills are needed in the workforce.

Businesses in Washington can’t find enough qualified job candidates, and schools aren’t turning them out. Meanwhile, thousands of people remain unemployed.

Local experts rely on teamwork and patience to bring tidal power to the Northwest.

Bothell’s Ekos Corp. has a new treatment that could improve patients’ recovery from strokes. But the company needs more funding to make it happen.

A local clothing firm develops a cleaner method of making fabric from bamboo.

Businesses increasingly have more to gain from smartphone technology.

A Kent company comes out with sci-fi technology: refueling aircraft with lasers.

2010’s Hall of Fame winner has consistently shown that making communication with employees a priority reaps rewards.

PacMed takes its employees’ health seriously.

The WTIA transformed itself into a powerhouse advocacy and networking organization for the region’s technology companies.

Gig Harbor’s Threshold Group has weathered the storm.

“Welcome to CashLinq. Here’s your Nerf gun.”

Madrona Solutions does small business the right way.

From communications to pancake breakfasts, Heritage Bank keeps its staff happy.

Allyis has turned internal communication into an art form.

At Novo Nordisk, Danish isn’t breakfast; it’s the style of benefits its employees share.

Columbia Bank’s open-door policy wins fans.

Employees keep coming back to Cobalt Group.

At PAML, employee health is a top priority.

What does it take to be a Best Company to Work For?