Commentary

Although we are still in the early months of a new presidential administration, we have seen an upending of the status quo and an undoing of America’s role as a leader in a more integrated, global economy.

During World War II, when accommodations were scarce, the house where I’ve lived for the past 28 years was a flophouse for more than a dozen railroad workers. Beds were lined up six to a room.

If there exists a common thread in the crazy-quilt method of the Kushner/Trump administration, it surely must be the enthusiastic repudiation of “government overreach.”

There’s a growing bipartisan consensus that a carbon tax just makes sense. A group of national Republican leaders with the Climate Leadership Council recently released a climate plan advocating for a carbon tax.

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Albers School of Business and Economics' Dr. Marilyn Gist shares advice for business leaders, including how technology impacts leadership, the quality most business leaders share, and the downside of being driven

Data permeate nearly every industry and corner of our lives. As businesses equip themselves with artificial intelligence (AI) to make sense of it all, experts predict the AI market will grow to $70 billion by 2020 and much of that growth will occur right here in Seattle.

A young, diligent man I know came to the Seattle area from Mexico as a toddler. Permitted recently to work legally under former President Obama’s DREAM Act, the young man found a job at a used-car dealership. With bilingual skills and personal charm, he sold several cars in his first weeks on the job. Sadly, his employer took advantage of anti-immigrant sentiment stirred up by President Donald Trump to fire the young man, depriving him of commissions he was owed.

Being disruptive used to be a bad thing. Society frowned on those who would disrupt a classroom, a meeting, the steady flow of traffic, someone’s sleep.

With multinationals like nike capable of moving production from one cheap source to another — shifting production from Japan to China and now to Vietnam — and with uber-efficient importers like Costco, Walmart and Amazon bringing goods straight from factory to consumer, the United States has become the bargain basement of the world.