Tech Association Announces Industry Achievement Finalists

 
 

The Washington Technology Industry Association announced the finalists for its 16th annual Industry Achievement Awards. The awards recognize innovation and excellence within the technology industry in Washington State. Most of the companies mentioned have been featured in the pages of Seattle Business magazine.

The finalists are:

  • Commercial Product or Service of the Year: DocuSignIsilon Systems; thePlatform for Media, Inc.
  • Consumer Product or Service of the Year: Bonanza; Logos Bible Software; Swype
  • Service Provider of the Year: Concur; HasOffers; Hubspan
  • Best Early Stage Company of the Year: Ground Truth; Lockerz; Off & Away, Inc.
  • Best Seed Stage Company of the Year: Sparkbuy; SPARQCODE.COM; WhoCanHelp.com®
  • Innovative Manufactured Product of the Year: Intermec Technologies Corporation; Precor Incorporated; XKL, LLC
  • Best use of Technology in the Government, Non-profit or Educational Sector: CityClub - Living Voters Guide; OpenDataKit.org (part of UW/CSE); Washington State Ferries
  • Technology Leader of Tomorrow: Gizan Gando of Asa Mercer Middle School (sixth grade), Tyler Wong of Asa Mercer Middle School (sixth grade), Mariah Fernandez of South Shore K-8 (seventh grade)
  • Award for Excellence in Teaching: Barbara Franz, Moses Lake School District (math); Nancy Pfaff, Lake Washington School District (math); Debra Strong, Everett School District (science); Dawn Sparks, Thorp School District (science)

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