Serial Entrepreneur Jeremy Jaech Launches new company with UW Professor Shwetak Patel

 
 

Two years ago Shwetake Patel was on the cover of our magazine as a "Top Innovator" for his work on sensor networks in the home. Now he is helpiing to launch a new company that will commercialize that product with backing from Madrona Venture Group. One of the first applications will be a moisture sensor that can warn the homeowner when there is a possible leak. Moisture from flooding, roof leaks or appliances is a huge source of costly damage to homes. Check out the website of UW student Gabe Cohn who has been working on the technology.

 

Here's the press release:

Industry Veteran, Jeremy Jaech, Lands $1.5 Million from Madrona Venture Group and Radar Partners for Innovative Low Power Sensor Technology; Founds SNUPI Technologies

Developed at the University of Washington and Georgia Institute of Technology, SNUPI Technology Enables Home Monitoring at Low Power and Low Cost

December 11, 2012 -  Seattle, WA  - SNUPI Technologies, a new company that takes advantage of the wiring already in homes to create a wireless sensor network, launched today with $1.5 million in funding from Madrona Venture Group, Radar Partners and the founders.  The technology, also called SNUPI (Sensor Network Utilizing Powerline Infrastructure), was developed at the University of Washington and Georgia Institute of Technology by Professors Shwetak Patel and Matt Reynolds and others.

Co-founded by Jaech, Patel, Reynolds and UW graduate student Gabe Cohn, the company will use the financing to build the team, and to design and build the hardware and software implementations.  SNUPI Technologies is based in Seattle.

“SNUPI is an incredibly innovative technology that promises to provide low cost and reliable sensing technology that everyday people can take advantage of,” said Jeremy Jaech, CEO. “As our day-to-day lives become increasingly measured and recorded, SNUPI will make people’s lives better by providing insight into what is happening in their home and alerting them to potential hazards.  I’m very excited to work with Dr. Patel and Dr. Reynolds to bring this technology to market.”

“Madrona Venture Group has a long track record of supporting the commercialization of the remarkable technology that comes out of the University of Washington,” said Tom Alberg, Managing Partner, Madrona Venture Group.  “This team combines Jeremy’s business acumen with technological brilliance from highly esteemed professors and institutions.  SNUPI is positioned for growth in this emerging market of advanced sensor technology.”    This investment marks the 11th company Madrona has funded that is based on technology developed in the University of Washington’s Computer Science and Engineering department.  Previous investments have included Farecast (acquired by Microsoft), AdRelevance, and Skytap. 

Co-founders and Professors Shwetak Patel from the University of Washington Computer Science and Engineering department and Matt Reynolds from Duke University’s department of Electrical and Computer Engineering first developed the technology through collaboration with Professor Gregory Abowd’s research group at the Georgia Institute of Technology.  The technology was further developed at the University of Washington.

Jeremy Jaech is a successful, longtime entrepreneur, deeply committed to bringing life and work changing technology to the masses.  As a co-founder of Aldus, which invented desktop publishing through its PageMaker software, and of Visio which enabled everyone from engineers to business managers to plan work visually, he changed how industries operate and work gets done.  Since the acquisition of Visio by Microsoft, Jeremy has led several companies including Verdiem and Trumba and has served as the Chair of the Tech Alliance.  Jaech was appointed to the University of Washington Board of Regents by Washington Governor, Christine Gregoire, in the fall of 2012. 

Dr. Patel previously co-founded Zensi, Inc., an energy and water monitoring company that was acquired by Belkin, Inc. in 2010. Dr. Patel received a MacArthur Fellowship “the genius grant” in 2011, was a 2012 Sloan Fellow, and is widely seen as one of the most promising thinkers and inventors in this arena.

The company’s CTO is Matt Reynolds from Duke University’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Dr. Reynolds previously co-founded ThingMagic, Inc., an RFID systems firm, acquired by Trimble, and also co-founded Zensi Inc. with Dr. Patel.  He holds 10 patents and 20 pending patents.

Gabe Cohn, Ph.D. student in the UW Electrical Engineering department where he is advised by Professor Patel is the recipient of many awards including the Madrona Venture Group Top Research Prize in 2011 and a Microsoft Research Ph.D. Fellowship. His Ph.D. thesis is partly the basis of the SNUPI technology.

Ed Lazowska Is the 2016 Tech Impact Champion

Ed Lazowska Is the 2016 Tech Impact Champion

Lazowska, University of Washington Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science & Engineering, will be honored at Tech Impact Awards event.
 
 

In advance of its annual Tech Impact Awards event next month, Seattle Business magazine has named Ed Lazowska its 2016 Tech Impact Champion. The award recognizes a lifetime of work building up the University of Washington’s Department of Computer Science & Engineering into one of the nation’s top 10 programs; leading the UW eScience Institute to help scholars in fields ranging from astronomy to biology take advantage of data analytics; and tirelessly promoting a vibrant regional tech industry.

Tech Impact Champions are chosen not only because of their achievements in technology, but also for championing the region’s broader tech sector. Past inductees in Seattle Business magazine’s Hall of Technology Champions, previously called Lifetime Achievement Honorees, are John McAdams, former CEO of F5 Networks; Steve Ballmer, former CEO of Microsoft; Jeremy Jaech, cofounder of Aldus and Visio and chair emeritus of the Technology Alliance, and Tom Alberg, cofounder of Madrona Venture Group.

When Lazowska arrived in Seattle 39 years ago as an assistant professor, both the University of Washington and the region were very different places. In computer science, he was the newest of only 13 faculty members. The region’s tech industry largely consisted of Boeing, Fluke and Physio-Control. Microsoft at the time was still a dozen people in Albuquerque.

Today, the UW’s Computer Science & Engineering Department rivals Stanford’s and Carnegie Mellon’s for attracting tech talent and major research — accomplishments that Lazowska helped bring about. As the university’s Bill & Melinda Gates chair, his effort to recruit leading data scientists included personally reaching out to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who provided $2 million from Amazon to endow two professorships and personally met with researchers. A decade after leading fundraising to build the Paul G. Allen Center for Computer Science & Engineering, he is doing so again to build a new CSE facility that will help double the center’s capacity.

“Our job,” Lazowksa asserts, “is to provide socioeconomic mobility for bright kids in this region.”

Driving opportunities through research remains his passion, as his own studies in high-performance computing, multicomputer processing and big data science have proved. An early technical adviser on the formation of Microsoft Research and a member of two national advisory committees on science and technology policy, he has promoted private and public investment in “engineering things that one day in the future will be used in game-changing products.”

Lazowska believes big data and cloud computing “lie at the heart of 21st century discovery.” He helped found and now leads the UW’s eScience Institute, a cross-campus partnership that helps scholars in fields such as astronomy, biology and sociology take advantage of data analytics to enhance their research. Given the region’s far-reaching cloud expertise, Lazowska says, “This is an area that Seattle has the potential to own.”

Lazowska’s other initiatives include promoting K-12 STEM education and promoting gender diversity in the UW program. He champions the notion that all students should study computer science to cultivate the “computational thinking” skills needed for the new century.

Lazowska marvels at the region’s transformation into a place “with distinctive and innovative activities in the broadest range of areas.” With his trademark enthusiasm for UW and the local tech industry, this celebrated educator, researcher, adviser and booster has played an important role in that transformation.

Lazowska will be inducted at the Tech Impact Awards, which will honor 19 technology leaders, at Showbox SoDo on September 21.