A New Coaltion to Promote Information Technology

 
 

Technology executives like to complain of the lack of qualified computer technology talent to fill open jobs. Speaking at Thursday’s annual Washington Innovation Summit,  for example, Microsoft general counsel Brad Smith spoke woefully of the 6,000 high-skill jobs unfilled at his company alone. This time, however, the leaders offered up a solution.

 

Bill Richter, president of EMC Isilon Storage Division, announced the formation of a special alliance of Washington tech companies focused on helping the state’s tech industry to stay competitive. The effort, which would include initiatives to promote education, included such founding members as Amazon, AT&T, Big Fish Games, Concur, INRIX, Isilon Storage Division/EMC, Microsoft, Synapse Product Development and the Washington Technology Industry Association (WTIA).

 

Richter said the coalition would draw attention to the important role played by the state’s technology sector. “We need to get attention and get our voice heard,” he said.  “If we do this right, then technology will be the first thing people will wake up with.” It's unclear however what specific educational initiatives the group will promote.

 

Washington Governor-elect Jay Inslee made a brief stop at the conference, and made a plea for the tech industry and others to join hands with the state, providing public service assistance as well as expertise to the financially strapped state government.  After Inslee’s speech, Richter was seen talking to Inslee and promising, “I’ll call you,” followed by a friendly handshake.

 

 

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

The 2016 Washington Manufacturing Awards: Legacy Award

Winner: Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 
 
Legacy Award
Belshaw Adamatic Bakery Group
Auburn › belshaw-adamatic.com
When it’s time to make doughnuts — or loaves of bread, or sheets of rolls — it could well be a Belshaw Adamatic piece of equipment that’s turning out the baked goods. From a 120,000-square-foot plant in Auburn, Belshaw Adamatic produces the ovens, fryers, conveyors and specialty equipment like jelly injectors used by wholesale and retail bakeries.
 
The firm’s two legacy companies — Belshaw started in 1923, Adamatic in 1962 — combined forces in 2007. Italy’s Ali Group North America is the parent.
 
It it takes work to maintain a legacy. A months-long strike in 2013 damaged morale and forced a leadership change. Frank Chandler was named president and CEO of Belshaw Adamatic in September 2013. The company has since strived to mend workplace relationships while also introducing a stream of new products, such as a convection oven, the BX Eco-touch, with energy saving features and steam injection that can be programmed for precise times in baking. The company energetically describes it as “an oven that saves time, reduces errors, makes an awesome product, and is fun to use and depend on every day!”
 
So far, more than 3,000 have been installed in quick-service restaurants, bakeries, cafés and supermarkets in the United States. They are the legacy of Thomas and Walter Belshaw, former builders of marine engines, who began producing patented manual and automated doughnut-making machines in Seattle 90 years ago. They sold thousands worldwide and, today, Belshaw Adamatic is the nation’s largest maker and distributor of doughnut-making equipment.