Local ad agency competes on reality show ...

 
 

Seattle advertising agency Wong, Doody, Crandall, Wiener recently competed for a national account with Subway, the sandwich chain.

On TV.

The agency's work, filmed at WDCW's Los Angeles office, will appear on a "sneak peek" of episode one of AMC's new reality show The Pitch at 11 p.m. Easter Sunday, immediately after the hit series Mad Men. The eight-part series, featuring other agencies competing for other accounts, resumes on April 30 at 9 p.m. 

Dozens of agencies declined requests to be on the show, but for WDCW the decision seemed clear. “We ask our clients to take risks, and we told ourselves that we should take a risk. Why not?” said Tracy Wong, chairman and executive creative director, in a phone interview. Wong said the company has nothing to hide, so it had little to fear by being on the show.

Still, Wong saw a screening of the Subway episode and says he isn’t happy with AMC’s edits. He had hoped the show would portray WDCW’s “Democracy of Good Ideas” process, which emphasizes a creative process he designed to minimize egos and drama. “We are inclusive and somewhat consensus driven, which is different from most businesses and very different from most ad agencies,” he said. “It was captured well during the filming, but didn’t come out well in the edits.”

Wong thinks editors were looking for drama, and since his firm had relatively little, he said most of the show is devoted to McKinney, the North Carolina-based agency competing for the Subway account.

“What people will see in the show is not a lot of us,” Wong said.

Did WDCW win the competition?

“Not necessarily,” Wong said, quickly adding that he's actually not allowed to say.  

Dining: Collective Consciousness

Dining: Collective Consciousness

It’s Josh Henderson’s world; here's your guide to eating in it.
| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

Ten years ago, Josh Henderson left a sweet gig cooking for photographers on location in Los Angeles to start a food truck in Seattle called Skillet. It did quite well, expanding with help from equity partners into four brick-and-mortar diners and a catering company. 

Henderson left the Skillet Group in 2013 to again do his own thing, that being the Huxley Wallace Collective (named for Henderson's two sons). Today, he’s the brains behind 10 restaurants, eight of them coming to life this year. While it’s impressive and challenging to open so many locations in quick succession, the real story is Henderson’s vision. Food and flavor are important, but equally, or more so, is the diner’s experience. 

Each restaurant is stylized. “We want to create joy and a sense of discovery for our guests,” says Henderson’s creative director, Matthew Parker, largely responsible for the look at each venue. “To Josh’s credit, he has put design on the same level as customer service and food, which is really new.”

Don’t know where to start? Use this primer to tell the restaurants apart and experience them for yourself. Find more info at huxleywallace.com.

QUALITY ATHLETICS
Pioneer Square | 121 S King St.
The name: “I wanted something a little kitschy and a little ambiguous.” 
The vibe: A 195-seat sports bar on steroids.
What to order: Jerk-spiced duck wings seasoned with cinnamon and cayenne, with pickled pomegranate seeds and lime yogurt ($12). 

WESTWARD
North Lake Union | 2501 N Northlake Way
The name: Inspired by a painting Henderson saw in a ship-supply store. “I saw it and it stuck in my head.”
The vibe: A yacht club for misfits.
What to order: House-made potato chips served with tonnato and capers ($12).

GREAT STATE BURGER
Downtown | 2041 Seventh Ave. 
Laurelhurst | 3600 NE 45th St.
The name: “We were going for something generic but that also drew on the state pride we have.”
The vibe: From the cornflower blue color scheme to the crinkle-cut fries and cheery polka-dot burger wrappers, Great State Burger is Americana on Prozac.
What to order: Steaming hot french fries ($3) are a must with the organically raised grass-fed beef burger ($5.50). Add an 8-ounce shake featuring locally made Parfait ice cream ($3.50). 

BAR NOROESTE
Downtown | 2051 Seventh Ave.
The name: It means “northwest” in Spanish. Enough said.
The vibe: Small, dark and sexy, with charred-wood elements and blue-gray-green concrete Mexican tiles that change color depending on the light shining through the street-front windows. 
What to order: Tacos for two — 10 handmade tortillas with your choice of two proteins, served with chef-paired veggies, dressings and a selection of house salsas ($45).

SAINT HELENS CAFE 
Laurelhurst | 3600 NE 45th St.
The name: A nod to our lopped-off mountain to the south. “The ‘saint’ was the part that showed a bit of brasserie,” Henderson says. “I also just like how the words look.”
The vibe: Bright and feminine, with mismatched vintage china, gold cutlery and locally made pink paper flowers. Super intimate. 
What to order: Slow-braised chuck in a spring onion soubise with charred savoy cabbage and demi sauce ($24).

SCOUT 
Downtown | Thompson Hotel | 110 Stewart St.
The name: “A scout is a youthful explorer, and we consider ourselves explorers of creating excellence in food and service while being playful ...," says Parker.
The vibe: Playful but high end and rooted in the materiality of the region, with reclaimed Douglas fir wood tables, cream linen drum shades and upholstery in mix-and-match wool plaid fabrics.
What to order: Trout with smoked artichoke cream, braised artichokes and clams ($25). 

THE NEST 
Downtown, Thompson Hotel | 110 Stewart St.
The name: “The Nest is about being at the top of the tree … where we nurture and feed you,” Parker says. 
The vibe: A little bit of Hollywood on the Thompson Hotel rooftop. (Ages 21 and over.)
What to order: Tableside oysters with a crisp Washington rosé.

These three open in August

CANTINE BOTTLESHOP& BAR 
South Lake Union | 513 Westlake Ave. N
The name: “I needed a simple name for a beer-driven watering hole,” Henderson says.
The vibe: An industrial beverage lab.  
What to order: Country ham with cheddar cheese, pickles and mustard on a milk roll.

POULET GALORE 
South Lake Union | 513 Westlake Ave. N
The name: “A cool name with a James Bond reference,” says Henderson.
The vibe: Like a market in Paris with the perfectly cooked rotisserie chickens to go.
What to eat: A whole, half or quarter chicken with kicky chimichurri sauce and crispy chicken-roasted potatoes.

VESTAL
South Lake Union | 513 Westlake Ave. N
The name: A Roman reference to the hearth, which, to Henderson, means home. “This place [is] my home base, where I’ll be cooking,” he says of the 49-seat restaurant. He’ll cook here three nights a week. 
The vibe: A masculine, midcentury-modern living room with walnut paneling and a 350-year-old Douglas fir stump fashioned into a hostess stand.  
What to order: Ricotta gnudi with roasted pork broth, hazelnuts, sorrel and Washington truffle.