Embarrassment for Nokia, Microsoft

 
 

No doubt some honchos at Microsoft are a little steamed right now. Nokia has apologized for misleading the media this week when it introduced its new Lumia 920 Windows Phone and showed video that was purportedly shot using the phone's new image stabilization technology. Turns out the video was a "simulation" of the PureView imaging capabilities, shot with a regular camera, not a smartphone. Nokia's top executives reportedly were not aware of the deception, and CEO Stephen Elop has asked the company's ethics officer to investigate, according to The New York Times. Elop, a former Microsoft executive, joined Nokia in 2011 shortly after the company announced its smartphones would use Microsoft's Windows operating system. Not sure which is more embarrassing: the actual deception, or the brass claiming no knowledge of it.

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