WASHINGTON'S LEADING BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Net Gains

Keeping a pro basketball team in seattle was one thing; making the Seattle Storm profitable is the next big challenge.
Sarah Dewey |   October 2011   |  FROM THE PRINT EDITION
Seattle Storm CEO Karen Bryant, foreground, with team owners, from left, Lisa Brummel, Ginny Gilder and Dawn Trudeau.

In a professional sports world where attendance has declined across the board and player lockouts have become dinner-table discussion topics, the Seattle Storm has experienced an increase in attendance and season-ticketholder retention. According to the organization, gross revenues have risen 76 percent in three years. Corporate sponsorship of the team has similarly increased, and the organization touts strong community partnerships. But the real thrill and challenge in the niche-market Women’s National Basketball Association—since its teams already play the best women’s basketball in the country—is to make the league a viable, respected, enduring business.

The women-owned Storm franchise is pulling its share of the load. And, says co-owner Dawn Trudeau of the organization’s business model, “It’s working.”

Having recently completed its 15th season, the WNBA, for better or worse, is stepping from the shadow of its fostering organization, the NBA. Even with big brother’s backing, the story of the league has been one of indigence and impermanence. Six WNBA teams have folded and three others have relocated as the league expanded from eight teams to 16 and then contracted to the current 12. Franchises shift regularly, often resulting in diluted talent and weak footholds in the cities where the teams play. Only three franchises—the New York Liberty, Los Angeles Sparks and Phoenix Mercury—remain in their original cities from the eight-team league that began play in 1997.

According to Jim Copacino, the Seattle-based ad wizard whose firm Copacino + Fujikado is behind much of the Seattle Mariners’ popular television advertising, the biggest challenge to the Storm’s future is the financial stability of the WNBA as a whole. “If every team were in Seattle’s position,” Copacino says, “I think you’d have a healthy and viable league. But we know that isn’t the case.” The WNBA’s new president, Laurel Richie, is optimistic, however. “When we have teams that are strong and steady and stable and growing,” she says, “then, by definition, so goes the league.”

The Storm’s business leadership understands and embraces this mandate. “Our goal is to play our part, however small or big that may be, in securing the financial viability of the WNBA,” says Storm president and CEO Karen Bryant, who was named Executive of the Year by the Seattle Sports Commission at the group’s annual Sports Star of the Year event last January. “And we think the most compelling way for us to do that is to build the model and