Final Analysis: Crowning Achievement

| FROM THE PRINT EDITION |
 
 

Welcome to “the dark months.” This is what Mick McHugh calls the period between the end of one baseball season in late September and the beginning of the next one in early April.

McHugh owns F.X. McRory’s Steak, Chop & Oyster House, which debuted in Pioneer Square in 1977, the same year the Seattle Mariners were born. If you’re a diehard Seattle sports junkie, you’ve probably quaffed or noshed at McRory’s at least once. If you have visited during the dark months, it was probably on a day when the Seattle Seahawks were playing football.

There are only eight Seahawks home games each NFL season, so the dark months—October through March—are a challenge for establishments like McRory’s that rely on the sports-obsessed public for much of their income. Basketball and hockey are played during the dark months, which is why McHugh probably thinks Chris Hansen is a heavenly combination of messiah, mensch and Merlin.

Hansen is the rich guy from San Francisco who wants to put a basketball/hockey arena near the existing football and baseball stadiums in Seattle. He has spent more than $50 million buying up property nearby. In a recent blog post, McHugh described Hansen’s arena as having “the potential to … make a difference in the lives of not only the business owners in the area … but the staff we will be able to keep on during those quiet times and the additional people we will have to hire.”

In sporting circles, Hansen has already had his halo fitting. His canonization is likely on the fast track because anyone who can bring professional basketball back to Seattle—and maybe a hockey team, too—while footing much of the bill for a new arena is destined to be seated at the right hand of Oprah come Judgment Day.

But on the day in September that Seattle was celebrating the City Council’s tentative agreement over the financing of Hansen Arena, I was moderating a panel discussion about the outlook for the Washington state economy in 2013. Susan Sigl, CEO of the Washington Technology Industry Association, mentioned that our economic future is inexorably linked to our ability to close the high-tech education gap—the yawning chasm between the huge number of available tech jobs in Washington and the small number of graduates qualified to fill them.

It’s an oft-heard refrain, but if we don’t improve education in the so-called STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering and mathematics), it doesn’t really matter if we get a shiny new version of the Seattle Sonics to play in a shiny new arena. Without a successful economy firing on all cylinders, adding one or two more teams to the professional sports landscape is like putting gas in a car whose fuel tank has a hole in it.

And so as I moderated the discussion, I began to wonder: Wouldn’t it be cool if somebody like Chris Hansen, a zillionaire who grew up in Seattle loving the Sonics and who wants to give back to the community he loves, were willing to pony up about $300 million to kick-start a first-class effort to close the tech education gap?

Look, I love sports. But sports is entertainment. It can boost civic identity to a point, but it’s not as if a city lives or dies according to the number of millionaire athletes it’s willing to coddle. Trust me. The city of Seattle and the state of Washington will survive without a pro basketball team. But without enough highly qualified tech graduates to stoke our economic engine, Mick McHugh’s dark months could become an all-year proposition.

JOHN LEVESQUE is the managing editor of Seattle Business magazine.

Looking for high investment returns? Consider investing in a family business.

Looking for high investment returns? Consider investing in a family business.

 
 

Investors do not lack opportunities to deploy their capital, but being able to generate respectable returns is much more difficult. Part of the problem is finding unique investment opportunities with significant upside in a crowded market. The best option may be to put money to work in a privately-held company.

But private companies pose challenges when it comes to understanding their business, and analysis of the company may be fraught with pitfalls. Or it may be that investors are simply not aware of the opportunity in the first place.

There is, however, an important trend that is clearly discernable in relation to family-held businesses. Wealthy families and individuals are increasingly attracted to the idea of providing capital directly to family businesses as part of their overall investing strategy. And the attraction is reciprocated – family-owned businesses are increasingly open to the idea of wealthy families and individuals providing capital.

At Cascadia Capital, we are seeing a rapid increase in the practice of families investing in families, which can be a highly effective solution for both businesses and investors. Family businesses can be attractive investments, particularly for other family businesses, private companies, individuals, or family offices, which are wealth management companies investing on behalf of a single family or individual. Family run businesses often employ management styles that these investors understand well and can offer portfolio diversification without the hefty fees charged by private equity funds and investment firms; fees that, over time, can add up to millions of dollars.

According to a recent survey by the Family Office Exchange, about 70 percent of family offices now pursue this strategy of direct investing. This may be, in part, due to a shift by family offices seeking to bypass layers of fees and a lack of transparency and control that are inherent to the private equity fund model. Instead, many family offices now prefer to invest directly on a deal-by-deal basis offering more direct control, additional flexibility for longer-term holds, and lower fees. 

From the perspective of family businesses, a significant number are considering alternative solutions to meet their strategic objectives. In the event of a sale, an acquisition by another family can be a compelling solution compared to a private equity or strategic buyer transaction. And when seeking financing for business activities, direct investments from family offices can offer significantly more flexibility than funding from private equity firms that are beholden to rigid criteria and fixed investment periods.

 

The benefits for family businesses of having a direct relationship with their investors or buyers can be numerous. For example, if a family is looking to sell its business, family office buyers can provide liquidity and the opportunity for owners to exit without having to sell to a competitor. If a family is looking for additional financing to fund growth, direct family office investments can offer more favorable terms than other traditional sources of financing.

 Importantly, wealthy families and individuals are more likely to take a long-term view of their investment and are not constrained by exit strategies devised to maximize value within a given time period. Further, these investors often made their money owning and operating successful companies and, as a result, are more likely to understand the nuances and unique challenges of family run businesses. 

This investment trend, while also being experienced in other parts of the country, is gaining momentum in the Pacific Northwest. We are increasingly finding private direct investments to be an effective solution for our family-owned business clients and our family office clients.

Choosing the right investment partner is one of the most challenging decisions a family business can make. We have worked with many private, family run businesses to design long-term, flexible capital solutions and introduce our clients to suitable family office and private investors with common objectives.

 For family offices, like any investment opportunity, buying into family businesses can be very attractive, but it is not without risk. Prior to investing, proper analysis calls for extensive financial due diligence to ensure interests and incentives are well aligned in the transaction. Success depends on ensuring both a structural and cultural fit. We actively encourage family business owners and family investors to work with experienced advisors to carefully explore every available option before determining the best course of action.

Christian Schiller is a managing director at Cascadia Capital, specializing in advising family businesses. Cascadia Capital is a Seattle-based investment bank serving middle market clients, globally.