WASHINGTON'S LEADING BUSINESS MAGAZINE

Executive Q & A: Sally Jewell, President and CEO of REI

Since joining REI in 2000, first as COO and later as CEO, Jewell worked with the management team to help turn the consumer co-op from a money-losing business into a vibrant, modern organization with annual revenues that have climbed 250 percent to $1.8 billion.
Leslie D. Helm |   March 2012   |  FROM THE PRINT EDITION

compelling value proposition. If you take the top brands in the industry, we want REI products to represent equivalent quality for a lower price or a better product for the same price.

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT: Community service has been very important to me for decades. Whether it’s board work or volunteer work, you learn to lead through influence and not through power. I try to help share that ethos with my colleagues here. In a job like mine, you have a title that commands a certain amount of power, but when you are on a nonprofit board or you are volunteering, your title doesn’t really mean anything other than perhaps your ability to have influence.

INITIATIVE FOR GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT: The initiative was launched after 9/11. As we looked at the attacks on the United States, we thought, “Why does the world hate us?” We saw an opportunity to bring a business voice to the issues of global poverty, the idea that you are never going to solve global poverty if you don’t create economic opportunity in those communities. I was the first chair of the board. We’ve become a pretty effective national organization with people like George Mitchell, Madeleine Albright and Colin Powell involved. I’ve met with CEOs of African companies with sales of more than $100 million. One company produced retroviral drugs in Uganda while another had a seed and vegetable oil business in Zimbabwe. One of our group, the CEO of Cummins Engines, is investing $75 million in Africa. He wouldn’t have done that without those relationships. We would like to go beyond Africa to Latin America and South Asia.

EDUCATION: As a regent at the University of Washington, I’ve seen the university do some amazing things in a difficult environment. It has prioritized cuts in administration first and has worked hard to make sure that access is high regardless of socioeconomic background. Twenty-five percent of our students pay no tuition. The state wants us to create more graduates in high-demand fields like engineering and computer science, but that’s hard when the budget keeps getting cut. One possibility is to charge higher tuition in fields like engineering where you have high potential for earnings and it costs more to educate you.

ENVIRONMENT: Last year, we made $4.2 million in direct donations to nonprofits. We’ve facilitated over 3 million hours of volunteer work on public lands. And that’s not just picking up garbage. That’s swinging a Pulaski and an ax and building trails.